Saturday, 31 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. The Omen (1976)

On location at Fulham: Troughton,
Peck and director Richard Donner
The classic, Oscar-winning horror film, The Omen (shown again on Channel 4 last night) featured an intense performance (and a memorable death scene) from Patrick Troughton as doomed Father Brennan.
Here, the US ambassador to Britain, Robert 
Thorn (Gregory Peck) learns the shocking 
truth about his son Damien (Harvey 
Stephens) - he is the Antichrist, with a 
666 birthmark, and must be slain by 
means of sacred daggers.
Three sequels followed: Damien: Omen II 
(in 1978), Omen III: The Final Conflict 
(1981), and the TV movie, Omen IV: 
The Awakening (1991). 
The Omen (released by Fox in 1976) also
starred Lee Remick, Billie Whitelaw and 
eight other Doctor Who connections:

  • veteran Northern screen actor and prolific Big Finish artist David Warner (Keith Jennings here) portrayed the Doctor for Sympathy for the Devil (2003), Masters of War (2008) and The New Adventures of Bernice Summerfield 3: The Unbound Universe (2016), then voiced Sir Isaac Newton for Circular Time: Summer (2007), Co-ordinator Angell for Empathy Games (2008), Professor Boston Schooner for Deimos and The Resurrection of Mars (both 2010), Autarch Siris for The Children of Seth (2011), Biggs for The Rosemariners (2012), Cuthbert for the Fourth Doctor adventures The Sands of LifeWar Against the LaanThe Dalek ContractThe Final Phase (all 2013), Casualties of War and The Pursuit of History, and Shadovar for The War Doctor 2 (all 2016) - he also voiced Lord Azlok for Dreamland, then finally had a television role as Professor Grisenko in Cold War
  • Tommy Duggan (Priest) was Senator Alcott in The Mind of Evil
  • Roy Boyd (Reporter) was Driscoll in The Hand of Fear
  • Ronald Leigh-Hunt (Man) was Commanders, Julian Radnor in The Seeds of Death, and Stevenson in Revenge of the Cybermen
  • Eddie Powell (Policeman) was Thompson in the second Dalek film
  • Burnell Tucker (Agent) was Garner Two in The Angels Take Manhattan
  • Robert Rietty (Monk) voiced Bedloe for Death Comes to Time
  • Stuntman Alf Joint was a Heavy in The Ambassadors of Death
 The film was remade in 2006, and this (inferior) version of The Omen starred four further Doctor Who guest stars - Michael Gambon (from A Christmas Carol), Janet Henfrey (The Curse of Fenric and Mummy on the Orient Express), MyAnna Buring (The Impossible Planet), and Sara Houghton (daughter of Don Houghton and Pik Sen Lim)

Wednesday, 28 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. The Witness For The Prosecution

Sarah Phelps followed last year's version
of And Then There Were None with a
new festive Agatha Christie thriller.
The Witness for the Prosecution began
life as a short story, published as Traitor Hands by Flynn's Weekly in 1925.
The courtroom drama was first adapted
for radio in 1949, then was dramatised
for the London stage in late 1953.
During its run, Christie also had two
other plays staged, making her the
only female playwright to have three
productions performed simultaneously
in the West End.
The play was soon adapted for cinema
in 1957, starring Charles Laughton,
Marlene Dietrich and Tyrone Power.
The original story has now garnered
four treatments for television - previous serials appeared in 1949 (BBC), 1953 (CBS), 1982 (Hallmark).
Christie aficionado Kim Cattrall contacted Mammoth Screen when BBC One
announced plans for the newest version, and was consequently cast as
Emily French.
The two-part mystery concluded on BBC One last night - it featured Andrea
Riseborough (as Romaine), Billy Howle (Leonard Vole), and nine Doctor 
Who cast and crew connections:

  • Toby Jones (Mayhew) was the Dream Lord in Amy's Choice, and voiced renegade Time Lord Kotris for Big Finish's Dark Eyes (2012)
  • David Haig (Carter) was Pangol in The Leisure Hive
  • Tim McMullan (Meredith KC) voiced Octavian for Doom Coalition 3 (BF, 2016)
  • Charles De'Ath (Deveraux) was Adelaide's Father in The Waters of Mars
  • Andrew Havill (Starling) was the Chief Steward in Voyage of the Damned, and voiced both Aleister Portillon and Squire Claude for The Witch From the Well (BF, 2011)
  • executive producer Damian Timmer made a cameo appearance in An Adventure in Space and Time as a Menoptera
  • SFX supervisor Scott McIntyre was the armourer on The Day of the Doctor
  • Julius Ogden (first assistant camera) was focus puller on nine stories (from Closing Time to the 50th Anniversary special)
  • Joe Russell was also a camera operator on thirty-seven episodes (from Blink to the Anniversary special)

Tuesday, 27 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Pride


Co-produced by BBC Films and released by Pathé, Pride was first screened 
at the Cannes Film Festival in 2014 (where it won the Queen Palm award),
then was nominated for BAFTA and Golden Globe awards. A stage musical adaptation is also planned.
The film depicts the true story of the Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners campaign, founded in London by Mark Ashton (played here by Ben
Schnetzer) in 1984.
Because the National Union of Miners was reluctant to accept the group's
support during the miner's strike, the LGSM instead 'adopted' the Welsh
mining village of Onllwyn, and Pride examined the alliance between the
two communities. Following the year-long strike, strong links were forged
between the Labour party, their trade union affiliates and the LGBT
movement.
Pride was shown on BBC2 last night, and starred Dominic West (The Wire),
Paddy Considine (The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher), Andrew Scott (Sherlock),
George MacKay (11.22.63), and seventeen Doctor Who cast and crew
connections:

  • Faye Marsay (Steph) played Shona McCullough in Last Christmas
  • Bill Nighy (Cliff) was Dr. Black in Vincent and the Doctor
  • Imelda Staunton (Hefina) provided the Interface voice for The Girl Who Waited
  • Liz White (Margaret) was Alice in The Snowmen
  • Jessica Gunning (Sian) was Stacey Campbell in Partners in Crime
  • Rhodri Meilir (Martin) was Rhodri in The Runaway Bride
  • Lisa Palfrey (Maureen) was the Mum in Attack of the Graske
  • Russell Tovey (Tim) was Midshipman Alonso Frame in Voyage of the Damned and The End of Time, Part 2
  • Karina Fernandez (Stella) voiced Captain Tamasan for The Time War 1 (BF, 2017)
  • Emma Jason (Protester) was an Undercover Officer in Death in Heaven
  • Jim McManus (Old Man) was an Opthalmologist in The Invisible Enemy
  • Alan Bond (Rioter) was a UNIT Soldier in The Sound of Drums, Last of the Time Lords and Torchwood: Children of Earth
  • Liz Griffiths was also a set decorator on seven adventures (from Dalek to The Parting of the Ways)
  • SFX technician Mike Crowley was SFX supervisor on eight stories (from The Girl in the Fireplace to Doomsday)
  • Russ Perkin was also a SFX technician on eleven instalments (from The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe to The Husbands of River Song)
  • SFX supervisor Chris Reynolds was a technician on Terror of the Vervoids and Battlefield
  • Tony Gibson (sound FX editor) and Nigel Squibbs (sound mixer) both worked on An Adventure in Space and Time

Monday, 26 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Tintin

Hollywood director and famous Whovian Steven Spielberg (born 1946) was first linked with Doctor Who when his production company Amblin was involved with initial attempts to create an American based version of the programme 
in the 1990s. This ultimately led 
to Philip Segal's TV movie of
1996.
In 2011, Spielberg paid tribute 
to the co-writer of Tintin, Steven Moffat and his other British contributors: "Steven wrote 
one of my favourite TV shows.. Peter Jackson and I felt whoever did Dr. Who would have a good sensibility for Tintin. And it so happens Steven read [the books] since he was eight. Even when he had to leave the project to get on with making Dr. Who,
I got two other Brits - Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead) and Joe Cornish
(Attack the Block) - to finish the job. They're two great writers." A sequel, Prisoners of the Sun (scripted by Anthony Horowitz) is still in development.
The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (released in late 2011) was screened again on BBC1 today, and featured Jamie Bell (as Herge's hero), Andy Serkis (Captain Haddock), Daniel Craig (Sakharine), and the vocal talents of 
these seven Doctor Who guest actors:

  • Nick Frost (Thomson) played Santa Claus in Last Christmas
  • Simon Pegg (Thompson) was the Editor in The Long Game, voiced Don Chaney for Big Finish's Invaders From Mars (2002), and narrated the first series of Doctor Who Confidential
  • Toby Jones (Silk) was the Dream Lord in Amy's Choice, and voiced renegade Time Lord Kotris for Dark Eyes (BF, 2012)
  • Tony Curran (Delcourt) was Van Gogh in Vincent and the Doctor
  • Daniel Mays (Allan) was Alex in Night Terrors
  • Martin Dew (Stroller) was a Russian commando in The Curse of Fenric
  • Phillip Rhys (Co-Pilot/Medic) was Ramone in The Husbands of River Song

Sunday, 18 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Agatha Christie: A Life in Pictures

This BBC Two drama, first shown
in September 2004, celebrated
the life and career of the Queen
of Crime (1890-1976), played
by Olivia Williams.
Christie's story is told in flashback,
from her perspective at two distinct
times in her life - firstly through
the sessions with her psychiatrist
(following her disappearance in
1926), and then via interviews
with journalists at the tenth
anniversary of The Mousetrap
in 1962.
Much of the film focused on her
famous eleven-day disappearance,
after her first husband, Archibald
Christie, had asked Agatha for a
divorce. Whilst some contemporary
commentators suggested a publicity
stunt, the doctor here concluded
that the writer had experienced a fugue state, and her memory loss was genuine.
Repeated again today on the Drama channel the biopic featured Bonnie Wright
(as Young Agatha), Mark Gatiss (Kenyon), and six other Doctor Who cast and
crew connections:

  • Anna Massey (Older Agatha) voiced Miss Pollard for Big Finish's The Girl Who Never Was (2007)
  • Raymond Coulthard (Archie) voiced Loki, Edgar and Hawks for Cobwebs (BF, 2010), Ralph for Suburban Hell (2015), and Robac, Servers and Dalmari for The First Doctor Adventures 1 (2018)
  • Anthony O'Donnell (Belgian/DCC Kenward/Poirot) was Commander Kaagh in The Sarah Jane Smith Adventures: The Last Sontaran and Enemy of  the Bane
  • Bertie Carvel (Max Mallowan) was the Mysterious Man in The Lazarus Experiment
  • Tim McMullan (Pharmacist) voiced Octavian for Doom Coalition 3 (BF, 2016)
  • Mick Pantaleo was also the first assistant director on A Christmas CarolThe Doctor's Wife and Night Terrors

Thursday, 15 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Sherlock Holmes, Series 2 (1968)

Conan Doyle aficinado Peter
 Cushing reprised his cinematic
 portrayal of the Great Detective
 for the BBC's second series of
Sherlock Holmes in 1968, when
he replaced Douglas Wilmer - 
Nigel Stock again played Dr.
Watson. 
The show (now broadcast in colour) consolidated its initial
success by increasing ratings
to 15.5 million viewers.
Hammer's version of The Hound 
of the Baskervilles (1959) featured Cushing's first take as Holmes, and 
the TV adaptation of the mystery 
was the first to be filmed in its Dartmoor setting.
Cushing returned to the role one last time for The Masks of Death in 1984, and
even appeared as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in The Great Houdini for Fox in 1976.
Only six episodes from the sixteen-part season exist in the archives and were 
first issued on DVD in 2004 - the whole run starred no less than fifty-seven 
Doctor Who cast and crew connections:

The Second Stain (UK TX: September 9 1968)
  • Clifford Cox (PC MacPherson) was the Sergeant in (episode 3 of) Spearhead from Space
  • Cherie Lunghi (Emily) voiced Lady Adela Forster for Big Finish's The Emerald Tiger (2012)
  • Derek Waring (Fournaye) was Shardovan in Castrovalva 
  • Freddie Earlle (Mitton here, and Cab Driver in part three) was Aldo in Warriors' Gate
The Dancing Men (UK TX: September 16)
  • Brenda Bruce (Saunders) was Tilda in Paradise Towers
  • Henry Gilbert (Armstrong) was Torbis in The Curse of Peladon
  • Richardson Morgan (Martin) was Corporal Blake in The Web of Fear, and Rogin in The Ark in Space
  • David Simeon (Constable) was Private Latimer in Inferno, and Alastair Fergus in The Daemons
A Study in Scarlet (UK TX: September 23)
  • George A Cooper (Inspector Gregson) was Cherub in The Smugglers
  • William Lucas (Inspector Lestrade) was Range in Frontios
  • Ed Bishop (Stangerson) voiced General Finch for Unbound: Full Fathom Five (BF, 2003)
  • Michael Goldie (Murcher) was Jack Craddock in The Dalek Invasion of Earth, and Elton Laleham in The Wheel in Space
  • Heather Stewart was also the make-up artist on Day of the Daleks and The Talons of Weng Chiang
  • Charles Parnall was a film cameraman on The Chase too
  • Alan Fogg was also sound mixer on Planet of GiantsThe Celestial ToymakerImage of the Fendahl and Warriors' Gate
  • film editor Larry Toft edited Genesis of the Daleks too
The Hound of the Baskervilles (UK TX: September 30 & October 7)
  • Gerald Flood (Sir Hugo) provided the voice of short-lived robot companion Kamelion for The King's Demons and Planet of Fire
  • Philip Bond (Stapleton) was Ganatus in The Daleks
  • Christopher Burgess (Barrymore) was Swann in The Enemy of the World, Professor Phillips in Terror of the Autons, and Barnes in Planet of the Spiders
  • Penelope Lee (Laura) was the Computer voice in Revelation of the Daleks
  • John Baker was also a film camerman on twenty-nine instalments of the classic series, from The Evil of the Daleks to The Twin Dilemma
  • technician John Summers was a lighting director on Frontios and Planet of Fire
  • film editor Sheila S Tomlinson edited Revenge of the Cybermen too
The Boscombe Valley Mystery (UK TX: October 14)
  • director Viktors Ritelis had been a production assistant on The Crusade and The Daleks' Master Plan: Destruction of Time
  • Gertan Klauber (Fat Man) was the Galley Master in The Romans, and Ola in The Macra Terror
  • Jack Woolgar (Moran) was Sergeant Arnold in The Web of Fear
  • Michael Godfrey (Lanner) was Captain Pike in The Smugglers
  • script editor Donald Tosh also edited twenty-seven William Hartnell era episodes, from The Time Meddler to The Massacre
The Greek Interpreter (UK TX: October 21)
  • Steve Plytas (Manikuros) was Wigner in The Tenth Planet
  • Clive Cazes (Melas) was the Guard Captain in The Massacre
  • Nigel Terry (Latimer) was General Cobb in The Doctor's Daughter
  • Peter Woodthorpe (Kemp) was a voice artist on Whatever Happened to Susan?
The Naval Treaty (UK TX: October 28)
  • Peter Bowles (Harrison) was Lionel Carson in The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Man Who Never Was
  • Patrick Tull (Groot) voiced the titular aliens in The Krotons
  • Robin Wentworth (Tangey) was Professor Horner in (episode one of) The Daemons
Thor Bridge (UK TX: November 4)

The Musgrave Ritual (UK TX: November 11)
  • Dominic Allan (Sergeant) was a Policeman in (episode 5 of) The Invasion
Black Peter (UK TX: November 18)
  • John Baskcomb (Landlord) was Luigi Rossini in Terror of the Autons
  • John De Marco (Lancaster) was a Lynch Mob Member in The Gunfighters, and a Mexican Bandit in The War Games (8)
  • Ilona Rodgers (Rachel) was Carol in The Sensorites
Wisteria Lodge (UK TX: November 25)
  • Philip Anthony (Walters) was Roald in The Daleks' Master Plan: The Nightmare Begins
  • Derek Francis (Eccles here, and Mycroft Holmes in the first series) was Nero in The Romans
  • Tutte Lemkow (Jose) was Kuiju in Marco Polo, Ibrahim  in The Crusade: The Warlords, and  Cyclops in The Myth Makers 
  • Roy Stewart (Mulatto) was Toberman in The Tomb of the Cybermen, and Tony in Terror of the Autons
Shoscombe Old Place (UK TX: December 2)
  • Kevin Lindsay (Norlett) was the Sontaran, Commander Linx inThe Time Warrior, Cho Je in Planet of the Spiders, then both Field Major Styre and the Marshal in The Sontaran Experiment
  • John Lawrence and Maurice Quick (Racegoers) were a Parisian Man in The Massacre, and the Gold Usher in The Deadly Assassin respectively
  • Peter Miles (Brewer here, and Williamson in the next episode) was Dr. Charles Lawrence in The Silurians, Professor Whitaker for Invasion of the Dinosaurs, then was Nyder in Genesis of the Daleks, a role he reprised for both The Trial of Davros (2005), and I, Davros: Guilt (BF, 2006) - he also voiced Tragan for The Paradise of Deathand Curator Gantman for Whispers of Terror (BF, 1999)
The Solitary Cyclist (UK TX: December 9)
  • Ysanne Churchman (Mrs. Bainbridge) voiced Alpha Centauri for both Peladon stories, and a titular alien for Planet of the Spiders
  • Clyde Pollitt (Trivett here, and a Sergeant in the last serial) was a Time Lord in The War Games, and the Lord Chancellor in The Three Doctors
  • Alan Tucker (Clerk) was Latep in Planet of the Daleks
The Sign of Four (UK TX: December 16)
  • Big Finish artist Ann Bell (Mary) voiced Sylvia O'Donnell for Thousand Tiny Wings (2010), Professor Gesima Cazalet for Night of the Stormcrow (2013), and Lisa Burrows for The Diary of River Song 2 (new for 2017)
  • John Stratton (Jones) was Shockeye of the Quawncing Grig in The Two Doctors
  • Ahmed Khalil (Lal Rao) was Latoni in Black Orchid
  • Ves Delahunt (Policemen) was a Thal in The Daleks: The Rescue, and a UNIT Soldier in The Silurians
  • David James (Policeman) was the Sheik in The Daleks' Master Plan: The Feast of Steven
The Blue Carbunkle (UK TX: December 23)
  • Edna Dore (Mrs Oakshott) was Maeve in Fear Her
  • Ian Watson was also the production designer on The Space Pirates and Terror of the Autons

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Sherlock Holmes, Series 1 (1965)

BBC1's second television adaptation 
of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's detective 
stories began in 1964 with a pilot 
episode, starring Douglas Wilmer 
(1920-2016) as Sherlock Holmes and 
Nigel Stock (1919-1986) as Dr. John 
Watson. A full, twelve-part series (the channel's first since 1951) followed a
 year later which proved popular with 
eleven million viewers. 
Wilmer was replaced by Hammer's
Holmes actor, Peter Cushing (1913-
1994) for a second run in 1968, but returned to the role for Gene Wilder's
 The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' 
Smarter Brother (1975), and even 
made a cameo appearance for 
Sherlock: The Reichenbach Fall 
(2012).
The whole first season of Sherlock 
Holmes - shown in black and white - 
exists in the archives (although two instalments are incomplete), and was given 
an American DVD release in 2010.
Stock later played Professor Hayter in Time Flight, and the mysteries featured
Patrick Troughton (as Mortimer Tregennis in part three), Roger Delgado 
(as Moser in the final story), and thirty-eight other Doctor Who cast and 
crew connections:

The Speckled Band
(UK TX: May 18 1964/Repeated September 25 1964)
  • Donald Douglas (Armitage) was Vural in The Sontaran Experiment
  • costume supervisor Joyce Hawkins was costume designer on Horror of Fang Rock
The Illustrious Client (UK TX: February 20 1965)
  • Peter Wyngarde (Gruner) was Timanov in Planet of Fire
  • Jennie Linden (Violet) was seen as Barbara in Dr. Who and the Daleks just three months later, and voiced Professor Klyst for Big Finish's Unregenerate (2005)
  • Norman Mitchell (Johnson) was a Policeman in The Daleks' Master Plan: The Feast of Steven
  • Billy Cornelius (Leary) was a Man-at-Arms in The Crusade: The Warlords, and a Morok Guard in The Space Museum
  • Martin Gordon (Footman) was a Prison Officer in The Mind of Evil
  • cinematographer Ken Westbury was a film cameraman on The GunfightersThe Abominable SnowmenFury from the Deep and The Invasion of Time
  • Peter Diamond was a regular stunt double and fight arranger on eighteen episodes of the classic run, from The Dalek Invasion of Earth to The Daemons
  • script editor Anthony Read also edited thirty-eight classic era episodes, from (part one of) The Image of the Fendahl to The Armageddon Factor, and wrote The Horns of Nimon
The Devil's Foot (UK TX: February 27)
  • Frank Crawshaw (Owen) was Arnold Farrow in Planet of the Giants
The Copper Beeches (UK TX: March 6)
  • Alethea Charlton (Mrs. Rucastle) was Hur in 100,000 BC, and Edith in The Time Meddler
  • Michael Robbins (Toller here; Breckinridge in The Blue Carbuncle, 1968) was Richard Mace in The Visitation
The Red-Headed League (UK TX: March 13)
  • Trevor Martin (Ross) was the first actor to portray the Doctor on stage in Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday (1974) and for the subsequent Big Finish adaptation (2008) - he was the second Time Lord in The War Games, and also voiced multiple roles for The Paradise of Death (1993), then Professor Capra for Flip-Flop (BF, 2003)
The Abbey Grange (UK TX: March 20)
  • Kenneth Thornett (Mitchell) was an Inspector in The Feast of Steven
The Six Napoleons (UK TX: March 27)
  • James Bree (Barnicot) was the Security Chief in The War Games, Nefred in Full Circle, and the Keeper of the Matrix in The Trial of a Time Lord: The Ultimate Foe
  • Arthur Hewlett (Brown) was Kalmar in State of Decay, and Kimber in Terror of the Vervoids
  • Desmond Cullum Jones (Constable) was a Worker in (episode two of) The War Machines
  • Donald Hewlett (Harker) was Hardiman in The Claws of Axos
  • Terry Leigh (Venucci) was a Sailor in The Chase: Flight Through Eternity, and an Egyptian Warrior in The Daleks' Master Plan: Golden Death
The Man With The Twisted Lip (UK TX: April 3)
  • Olaf Pooley (Lascar) was Professor Stahlman in Inferno
  • cinematographer Dick Bush was a film cameraman on The Rescue and The Romans
The Beryl Coronet (UK TX: April 10)
  • Leonard Sachs (Holder) was the Admiral Gaspard de Coligny in The Massacre, and Lord President Borusa in Arc of Infinity
  • Sandra Hampton (Lucy) was Maimuna in The Crusade: The Warlords
The Bruce Partington Plans (UK TX: April 17)
  • Derek Francis (Mycroft Holmes) and Bart Allison (Platelayer) both appeared in The Romans - as the Emperor Nero and Maximus Pettulian respectively
  • Erik Chitty (Waiter) was Charles Preslin in The Massacre: War of God, and Co-ordinator Engin in The Deadly Assassin
  • Gordon Gostelow (Johnson) was Milo Clancey in The Space Pirates
  • John Woodnutt (Station Master here, and Pawnbroker in part 13) was Hibbert in Spearhead from Space, the Draconian Emperor in (episode 5 of) Frontier in Space, the Duke of Forgill and Broton in  Terror of the Zygons, and Seron in The Keeper of Traken
  • cinematographer AA Englander was a film cameraman on The Ambassadors of Death and The Claws of Axos 
Charles Augustus Milverton (UK TX: April 24)
  • Stephanie Bidmead (Lady Farningham) was Drahvin leader, Maaga in Galaxy 4
  • Derek Smee (Fitzallen) was John Ransome in Spearhead from Space
  • Stanley Speel was a film cameraman on Planet of Evil too
The Retired Colourman (UK TX: May 1)
  • director Michael Hayes also helmed The Androids of TaraThe Armageddon Factor and City of Death
  • Maurice Denham (Amberley) was Azmael in The Twin Dilemma, and voiced the President for The Paradise of Death
  • William Wilde (Ernest) was the Draconian Captain in Frontier in Space
The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax (UK TX: May 8)
  • Neil Stacy (Jules) voiced Cyril Haggard for The Emerald Tiger (BF, 2012)
  • Ivor Salter (Sergeant) was the Morok Commander in The Space Museum, Odysseus in The Myth Makers, and Sergeant Markham in Black Orchid

Monday, 12 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Silent Witness, Series 13

The thirteenth season of this popular crime
 drama was first broadcast on BBC One in
the winter of 2010, and again starred regular
series actors, William Gaminara, Tom Ward,
and Emilia Fox as Home Office pathologists, Professor Leo Dalton, and doctors Harry Cunningham and Nikki Alexander.
The recurring character of Professor Janet
Mander (played by Jaye Griffiths) also
returned in three stories here, and the next
two seasons.
The ten-part series began another repeat run
on the Drama channel last night, and featured these eighteen Doctor Who cast and crew connections:

Intent (UK TX: January 7 & 8)
  • Griffiths was Jac in The Magician's Apprentice and The Zygon Invasion, and voiced Daylin for Big Finish's The War Doctor 2: Infernal Devices (2016)
  • Jonty Stephens (Alan) voiced Paravatar for 1963: Fanfare for the Common Men (BF, 2013)
  • series costume designer Suzanne Cave and her assistant Becky Brown both worked on An Adventure in Space and Time
  • film editor Jamie McCoan edited Blink too
  • prosthetics designer Waldo Mason was a SFX assistant on Aliens of London
  • Tom Lucy was also the stunt co-ordinator on sixteen adventures (from Smith and Jones to The Next Doctor)
  • Gordon Seed was also a stuntman on twenty-one stories, and the stunt co-ordinator on another thirteen (from The Idiot's Lantern to Kill the Moon)
Voids (UK TX: January 14 & 15)
  • Emily Joyce (Muriel) voiced a Clockwork Droid in The Girl in the Fireplace
  • Big Finish actor Tim Treloar (DS Vedder) voiced Van Cleef for Return of the Rocket Men, the Lord President for Dark Eyes, the Ancient One for Gods and Monsters, Lord Jack for Destination Nerva, Tyron for The Burning Prince (all 2012), both Telephus and Cisyphus for Mask of Tragedy (2014), Ergu for The Exxilons, and narrated The Third Doctor Adventures (both 2015), Damascus (2016) and Gardeners' World (2017)
  • Tim Palmer was also the cinematographer on Let's Kill HitlerThe Wedding of River Song and Nightmare in Silver
Run (UK TX: January 21 & 22)
  • Alec Newman (Carmody) voiced Ed Driscoll for Blue Forgotten Planet (BF, 2009), and Dr. Julius for The Silent Scream (new for 2017)
Shadows (UK TX: January 28 & 29)
  • Farren Blackburn also directed The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe and The Rings of Akhaten
  • Madeleine Rakic-Platt (Girl) was Ella in Forest of the Dead, and Lily Frobisher in Torchwood: Children of Earth
  • Ian Gelder (Dr. Jacobs) voiced the Commander for Last of the Cybermen (BF, 2010)
  • Stephen Pehrsson was also the cinematographer on eleven episodes from, The Pandorica Opens to The Crimson Horror
  • stunt co-ordinator Steve Griffin was a stuntman on The Idiot's Lantern
  • Annabelle Dowler (Paramedic) was Walter's Mother in The Snowmen
Home (UK TX: February 4 & 5)
  • Paul Wilmhurst also directed Kill the MoonMummy on the Orient Express and Last Christmas

Thursday, 8 December 2016

Doctor Who Vs. Asylum

Shown again on the Horror channel last night, 
this British horror film (known as House of 
Crazies in America) was the  fifth anthology
feature from Amicus Productions.
Prolific award-winning author and screenwriter
Robert Bloch (Psychoadapted four of his own short stories here (as portmanteau tales Frozen Fear, The Weird Tailor, Lucy Comes to Stay and
 Mannikins of Horror).
The feature was directed by Roy Ward Baker
(A Night to Remember, Quatermass and the 
Pit), and produced by Max Rosenberg and 
Milton Subotsky.
Released by Cinerama in 1972, the film 
featured regular Amicus lead and genre
legend Peter Cushing (as Smith), Robert Powell, Britt Ekland, Charlotte Rampling, Herbert Lom, and nine other Doctor Who cast and crew connections:

  • Richard Todd (Walter) played Sanders (pictured) in Kinda
  • Sylvia Syms (Ruth) was Mrs. Pritchard in Ghost Light
  • Geoffrey Bayldon (Max) was Organon in The Creature from the Pit, then later voiced Big Finish's first Unbound Doctor for both Auld Mortality (2003) and A Storm of Angels (2005)
  • Sylvia Marriott (Head Nurse) was Lexa's Follower in Meglos
  • John Franklyn-Robbins (Stebbins) was a Time Lord in (part 1 of) Genesis of the Daleks
  • Tony Wall (Houseman) was Napoleon Bonaparte in The Reign of Terror: Prisoners of Conciergerie
  • Anthony Waye (assistant director), Pamela Davies (continuity), and Gerald Larn (titles designer) all worked on Aaru's Dalek movies

Date With History: 1980

Monday, December 8th:
John Winston Lennon, aged 40, was shot four times in the back by Mark Chapman, who earlier today had asked the former Beatle for his autograph. Lennon was rushed from the scene - the Dakota apartment building in Manhattan - with his wife Yoko Ono, to St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Centre, where he died.
Chapman pleaded guilty to killing Lennon, and blamed voices in his head. He is currently serving a life sentence in Attica prison, Wyoming county, NY.

Tuesday, 6 December 2016

The Ripper and the Whoniverse, Part 6 [Revised]

The penultimate entry in my series 
examines the second volume of 
Ripper's Curse.

PART TWO September 30th 1888, and 
the 'Double Event'. Rory and Abberline 
arrive at Mitre Square in Aldgate, and the Inspector has the Doctor released. The
Time Lord explains that the Ripper isn't
a man at all, but "a creature [with]
taloned fingers, some kind of leecher [extracting] minerals from the deceased,
he's wearing a shimmer suit, drenched
in Kryon radiation". The culprit could be
either of two races, "The Ju'wes [or] the Re'nar" and the women's missing organs are merely "a tasty snack" to him, "The alien needs the victim to be scared, the tastier they become."
The Doctor then meets Warren, adding "You're looking for a shape-changing alien,
a Ju'wes hunter, blades for fingers" The nervy Commissioner tells this friend of 'Clouseau' that his imagination is worthy of H G Wells [i] before rushing away
(Wells' first books were only published in 1895). The Doctor deduces that the
Commissioner knows what the killer is, but how?
The travellers are next seen in Abberline's study at New Scotland Yard [ii]. Amy remembers reading about Jack the Ripper, "Wasn't it someone from the Royal family?" and Rory recalls "one more [murder, that of] Mary [Kelly] we could save her." Naturally, the Doctor disagrees, "Every Ripper victim is a static point in time and space [that] can't be altered" (a similar argument occurs at the end of
Matrix when the Doctor tells Ace that "those five women had to die, that's
[what] happened").
They are then summoned to nearby Goulsten (sic) Street to view a new clue -
a message [iii] that implicates the "Ju'wes." Warren now appears and orders the removal of the seemingly anti-semitic graffiti, but Inspector Smith protests (hereby voicing another theory), "you're.. defending your Freemason friends." The Doctor concludes that the alien Ripper has feasted enough for weeks, perhaps the reason why no killings occured the next month, October 1888.
Back in the TARDIS, the trio again discuss the last canonical murder. The Doctor declares that "Mary has to die, there has to be a fifth victim. All of London would be changed." Rory follows Amy back outside, but the Doctor is stung by a paralysing dart. The Re'nar Ripper tells the Time Lord that these "most horrific murders will be blamed on the Ju'wes" (mirroring the double-meaning of the graffito's key phrase).
Amy finds the Ten Bells pub [iv] where the landlord Bert is evicting two drunken women, Mary Warner and Mary Kelly. Amy tries to convince Kelly that she'll be slain by the Ripper on November 9th. The two prostitutes stagger off as Rory catches up with his wife.
At Scotland Yard, the fully recovered Doctor visits Warren - in reality, the Ju'wes creature (the real Sir Charles is on holiday) who is hunting the escaped Re'nar, Mac'atyde, here in Earth's past. They arrange to meet again in five weeks, when the Ripper strikes for the final time. Back at the TARDIS, the Doctor also tells Abbeline to be ready, at 9pm on November 8th - he now intends to save Kelly!
Fast forward to Miller's Court, off Dorset Street - Abbeline is supervising the police surveillance, and at midnight the inspector informs the Doctor that 'Warren' has resigned. Despite waiting all night, Mary doesn't return home, but at 10am, another murder is discovered upstairs in Kelly's room. The Doctor had told the police that Mary Warner, not Kelly, was the next victim. He now realises that Amy's warning
has altered time (Kelly's room was indeed at No. 13, but on the ground floor, a
subtle but vital change), and the present is fluid again - the Ripper "could kill
again, be anywhere." Amy meanwhile, has been captured by the Ripper!
"Next: The Canonical Twelve"

KEY Canonical Murders:
[1] Mary Ann Nicholls - Buck's Row, Friday August 31st 1888
[2] Annie Chapman - Hanbury St. Saturday September 8th
[3] Elizabeth Stride - Berner St. Sunday September 30th
[4] Catherine Eddowes - Mitre Square, also September 30th
[5] Mary Jane Kelly - Miller's Court, Friday November 9th

NOTES
 [iDoctor Who owes much to the stories of Herbert George Wells (1866-1946). 
The Doctor first met the writer on screen in Timelash, and actually became 
the inspiration for his subsequent works which he termed "science fiction." Wells again assisted the Doctor in The Time Machination (IDW, 2009). In The Ghosts
 of N-Space, the Doctor claimed to have lent 'Bertie' his ion-focusing coil for
 his invisibility experiments. When faced with the TARDIS interior in Pyramids 
of Mars, Laurence Scarman likens it to the "scientific romances of Mr. Wells." 
The Master reads The War of the Worlds (1898) in Frontier in Space, whilst 
the Doctor and Professor Chronotis both prefer The Time Machine (1895).
In the context of Ripper fiction, the film Time After Time (1979) sees a friend 
of Wells, Dr. Stevenson (played by Big Finish actor, David Warner) unmasked as 
Jack and he escapes to the future in the writer's own time machine. The hero of 
the US show Time Cop, Jack Logan, is sent back to 1888 to hunt a time traveller 
who has killed the real Ripper and taken on his identity. Incredibly, this episode, 
A Rip in Time (transmitted September 1997) not only includes a huge gaffe (here Eddowes is murdered on November 7th), but the police inspector, Wells, happens 
to be the uncle of H G Wells (and played by William Morgan Sheppard, see The
Impossible Astronaut).
[ii] Only in 1890 did the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police move from 
Whitehall to a new purpose-built base on the Victoria Embankment. In October 
1888, a female torso was discovered at the construction site for New Scotland 
Yard, but the police ruled out any connection to the concurrent Whitechapel 
Murders.
Between May 1887 and September 1889, the Thames Torso Murders were
committed in London. None of the four cases were solved, and only one
victim was identified.
[iii] At about 3am, PC Long found a dirty, bloody piece of Eddowes' [4] apron in
the stairwell of Model dwellings at Goulston Street. On the wall above was the
chalk-written message that is now known as the 'graffito.' Three slightly varied versions were recorded by Long, DC Halse, and Frederick Foster, before Warren demanded it's removal. Here, Smith probably represents the real detective, Halse, who advocated photographing the message, whilst waiting for his superior, Major Henry Smith (the City of London Commissioner and Warren's counterpart). Many interpretations of the graffito have been advanced ever since.
[iv] The Ten Bells pub still stands on the corner of Commercial and Fournier
Streets in Spitalfields. A 'victims board' on the wall opposite the bar even cites
Martha Tabram as a Ripper target. It is believed that Annie Chapman [2] and
Kelly [5] frequented the pub.